Those that know Meghan and I know that we have what appears to be an on going camera acquisition problem. To remedy this but continue to try out ALL of the cameras we have decided to start borrowing cameras from our fellow camera enthusiasts instead of trying to purchase or hoard them all to ourselves. Not all are winners though and some are just easier or more fun to use but you have to shoot with them first to find out! Thus, we decided if we run a roll through every camera we are interested in, not unlike going on a 5 minute date with a bunch of strangers at a singles night, we can quickly see which are worthy of being added to our collection (or put on our list of “must haves.”) Camera speed dating!

Here is the most recent camera I had the pleasure of a date with….the Purma Special 127.

 

A few quick facts about the Purma Special, made in England from 1937 to early 50’s. Its made of Bakelite and has a rather unique design. Its actually pretty clever if you ask me, it sports a curved focal plane shutter which has three speeds, its neat how one changes speeds, by positioning the camera differently when framing your photo, you achieve a slow 1/25, medium 1/150 or fast 1/450 shutter speed by keeping the camera horizontal or vertically framing to the left or right. It is referred to as gravity controlled.

I spied this camera at the fall Vancouver Camera show, the one held at the Croatian Cultural center twice a year. The gentleman had two of these, one was perfect and out of my price range and the other was not so perfect and STILL pricey, however it was Bakelite and had a unique shape — only after did I realize just how unique it was. It took me a while to finish my roll, I admit to being nervous about carrying it around with me because of its slippery exterior and odd shape, I am clumsy and it begged to escape my grasp and tumble down. Like with all my other “box” style point & shoot-esque Bakelite cameras I assumed 4 feet was the close the focus only to find that I either misjudged 4 feet OR the close focus is actually 6 feet or more! One thing I noticed is it must have a better Anastigmat lens in it than most because my photos seemed uncharacteristically sharp. Also because of its different shutter speeds I was able to get good photos in all types of light. This is definitely one of the keepers, makes me wish now that I’d sprung for the pristine one.

 


Those that know Meghan and I know that we have what appears to be an on going camera acquisition problem. To remedy this but continue to try out ALL of the cameras we have decided to start borrowing cameras from our fellow camera enthusiasts instead of trying to purchase or hoard them all to ourselves. Not all are winners though and some are just easier or more fun to use but you have to shoot with them first to find out! Thus, we decided if we run a roll through every camera we are interested in, not unlike going on a 5 minute date with a bunch of strangers at a singles night, we can quickly see which are worthy of being added to our collection (or put on our list of “must haves.”) Camera speed dating!

Here is most recent camera I had the pleasure of a quick date with….the Sawyers Nomad 620.

 

A few quick facts about the Nomad 620…manufactured first in 1957 it takes 12 square photos per roll. Has I & B settings and has a single shutter speed. It is definitely a fair weather camera.

The Nomad 620’s minimalist look makes it obvious designers were leaving the 50’s and moving toward the more stream line detailing of the 1960’s. When I saw it for the first time it reminded me more of an old radio than a camera. The Nomad 620’s manual boasted 4 foot focus, however after using it I feel as if it were more like 8 foot focus distance. I tried to shoot some movement with it, so I was waiting outside the liquor store and there were pigeons fluttering around as people walked straight through them. The picture would have been great on a REAL camera, but it was TOO blurry when taken with this one. The age of the film probably had something to do with the graininess of the photos, though I’d swear the picture close to the center of the roll were less grainy, as if the film deteriorated like an onion.

 


The Profoto A1 Fall Promotion continues! If you have been
waiting to purchase a Profoto A1, now is the time with the
extended promotion.
The Profoto A1 has been dubbed the world’s smallest
studio light. It is designed with very pleasing light shaping
capabilities;. It has a unique round head with a soft,
smooth fall-off that makes it easy to create a natural and
beautiful light. It also includes a smart magnetic mount
and three dedicated A1 Light Shaping Tools that click on
and off quickly and easily – a Dome Diffuser, Wide Lens
and Bounce Card. They can be stacked for more creative
options. The A1 offers a built-in LED modeling light that
makes it easy to set the light and understand how light and
shadows work together., and it’s extremely easy to use. Like
all Profoto products, it’s intuitive to use and you don’t need
to read a long instruction manual to understand how it
works.
An AirTTL remote is also built in to the A1. With AirTTL and
HSS you can create professional results fast & easy, and with
the remote you can seamlessly connect to other Profoto
flashes to control them easily from the A1.
Profoto A1 is not only an on-camera flash, it’s also very
effective off-camera as a standalone unit. The A1 has its
own Li-Ion high capacity battery built-in that lasts up to
four times longer than AA batteries with no performance
fade, and a facility to recharge quickly, so you can shoot for
longer with confidence. A1 can keep up with you because
it recycles four times faster than other on-camera solutions
– that’s 1.2s at full power. Put simply, you’ll never miss a
shot.
Purchase a Profoto A1 between now and February 18th and
get a free A1 battery. That is a $142.00 value!

Come into Beau Photo or contact Ken at  prosales@beauphoto.com  to pick up your A1 or for more information.


Those that know Meghan and I know that we have what appears to be an on going camera acquisition problem. To remedy this but continue to try out ALL of the cameras we have decided to start borrowing cameras from our fellow camera enthusiasts instead of trying to purchase or hoard them all to ourselves. Not all are winners though and some are just easier or more fun to use but you have to shoot with them first to find out! Thus, we decided if we run a roll through every camera we are interested in, not unlike going on a 5 minute date with a bunch of strangers at a singles night, we can quickly see which are worthy of being added to our collection (or put on our list of “must haves.”) Camera speed dating!

Here is the most recent camera I’ve started dating….Graflex Series B 3 1/4 x 4 1/4.

 

A few quick facts about the Graflex Series B…the model I have was produced from 1925-1937. It has a fixed horizontal back and uses 3 1/4 x 4 1/4 sheet film. The Graflex series B uses a focal plane shutter with 6 different tension settings. There’s a chart on the hood that shows which tension setting and speed equals which aperture. Most of these cameras have Kodak Anastigmat lenses.

I feel like this camera found me, a customer brought in a few cameras for consignment and in with the rest was the Graflex Series B – it was love at first sight! As per my usual I couldn’t have fallen in love with a camera that uses a ‘normal’ sized film. So once again I found myself attempting to cut down 4×5 sheet film in a dark bag, then later groveling to my friend asking if she’d once again cut 4×5 film down for me. I took two photos using my hand cut dark bag sheets and they actually turned out! I used my iPhone light meter app, “My Light Meter” to figure out which aperture I should be shooting. It was shockingly easy. Since then my friend has cut the correct size film for me from 4×5 sheet and it is a dream to put in the film holders, much less of a struggle! I hope to take the Graflex Series b out on Christmas day for more shooting on correctly cut film!

 


Those that know Meghan and I know that we have what appears to be an on going camera acquisition problem. To remedy this but continue to try out ALL of the cameras we have decided to start borrowing cameras from our fellow camera enthusiasts instead of trying to purchase or hoard them all to ourselves. Not all are winners though and some are just easier or more fun to use but you have to shoot with them first to find out! Thus, we decided if we run a roll through every camera we are interested in, not unlike going on a 5 minute date with a bunch of strangers at a singles night, we can quickly see which are worthy of being added to our collection (or put on our list of “must haves.”) Camera speed dating!

Here is most recent camera I had the pleasure of a quick date with…the Kodak Bantam 828.

A few quick facts about the Kodak Bantam 828…they made two different models. In my opinion the more basic black one is prettier, however, the model I have has the better lens – the ‘Anastigmat Special’ which is bettered only by the ‘Anastigmat Ektar’. The 828 film it uses was thought to be better because it had no sprocket holes which made the room for the image to be 30% larger.  The apertures range from f4.5 to f16 with a fast shutter speed of 1/200.

The only reason I was able to shoot this camera at all is I was lucky enough to get given a roll of 828 Kodak Safety film from 1971, it had been stored correctly so I was expecting it to work fairly well.

What first attracted me to the Bantam was the fact it had a green window instead of red, it also had an interesting lug where the camera straps attached. The Bantam I purchased had a broken viewfinder which I eventually fully removed, it’s not that necessary when framing a photo. I took this camera out for a quick walk around the west end. We ran into a peach coloured cat that would walk toward me as soon as I crouched down to take its portrait, so I had resigned myself to blurry kitteh photos, however I was pleasantly surprised when the pictures came back grainy but pin sharp. I had considered selling this camera, though after much discussion I think I have decided not to as it takes the best quality pictures of all my cheap little ‘miniature’ cameras. Though it’s not the cutest of all my tiny cameras and it does take 828 film, which is most difficult to find. However, it has made me want to persevere on the odd film size front. Hopefully in the future we can stock 828 and many other classic roll film sizes that haven’t been made in a while.


Those that know Meghan and I know that we have what appears to be an on going camera acquisition problem. To remedy this but continue to try out ALL of the cameras we have decided to start borrowing cameras from our fellow camera enthusiasts instead of trying to purchase or hoard them all to ourselves. Not all are winners though and some are just easier or more fun to use but you have to shoot with them first to find out! Thus, we decided if we run a roll through every camera we are interested in, not unlike going on a 5 minute date with a bunch of strangers at a singles night, we can quickly see which are worthy of being added to our collection (or put on our list of “must haves.”) Camera speed dating!

Here is most recent camera I had the pleasure of a quick date with…. the Pentax K2 DMD 35mm SLR.

 

 

A few facts about the Pentax K2 DMD, released in 1976 it is a K2 with slight improvements added for the professional market. In my opinion pointless features now a days; motor drive capabilities and a data back option. It has a high shutter speed of 1/1000 and ISO setting of 6400. I feel like that is way higher than other cameras of that era.

I love this camera. Mostly I just like looking at it. I got lucky, mine is extremely glossy and black. However, to say what I enjoy mechanically about the camera I’d have to say I liked its light meter, it has the shutter speeds listed up the right hand side of the viewfinder with a indicator needle. I find this method much easier and more informative than the light meter in the K1000. The only thing I found tricky to change was the ISO dial, but once I clued in fully on how it worked it became easy. Well it was still a little stiff compared to the ones we had up for sale in the store, but I used a pencil-eraser end to move it and it was much easier than hurting my fingers. The K2 DMD does not rely on a battery for anything but the light meter which is very handy considering the age of these cameras — the more mechanical the easier to fix them.

 


Those that know Meghan and I know that we have what appears to be an on going camera acquisition problem. To remedy this but continue to try out ALL of the cameras we have decided to start borrowing cameras from our fellow camera enthusiasts instead of trying to purchase or hoard them all to ourselves. Not all are winners though and some are just easier or more fun to use but you have to shoot with them first to find out! Thus, we decided if we run a roll through every camera we are interested in, not unlike going on a 5 minute date with a bunch of strangers at a singles night, we can quickly see which are worthy of being added to our collection (or put on our list of “must haves.”) Camera speed dating!

Here is most recent camera I had the pleasure of a quick date with…the Vest Pocket Autographic Kodak 127.

 

 

A few quick facts about the Vest Pocket Autographic Kodak; a folding style 127 camera, it was made for about ten years- 1915 to the mid 20’s. They made a regular Vest Pocket then added an ‘autographic feature’ which meant it has a little door on the back that allows access to the backing paper so one could write a note. Its fastest f~stop is 8 and shutter speeds are 1/25, B and 1/50. Interestingly they came in either a plain black enamel finish OR something called a Japan Crystal finish (which is what mine is)!

So my Vest Pocket speed date was more of a camping trip. I must also admit I used an old roll of Efke 127 film — I knew nothing of its sorted past. Before loading the camera I inspected its bellows which looked alright, however I did get a strange fogging that looked like an alien laser beam???? The camera is compact, if not a tad heavy but only because its made of metal. I quite liked using it. My only gripe is I wish I could have used it new, to see if the lens is sharper without all the fogginess it has grown over the years. I feel it was quite innovative for  100 years ago.

 


Those that know Nicole and I know that we have what appears to be an on going camera acquisition problem. To remedy this but continue to try out ALL of the cameras we have decided to start borrowing cameras from our fellow camera enthusiasts instead of trying to purchase or hoard them all to ourselves. Not all are winners though and some are just easier or more fun to use but you have to shoot with them first to find out! Thus, we decided if we run a roll through every camera we are interested in, not unlike going on a 5 minute date with a bunch of strangers at a singles night, we can quickly see which are worthy of being added to our collection (or put on our list of “must haves.”) Camera speed dating!

Here is most recent camera I had the pleasure of a quick date with…the Honeywell Visimatic 615.

 

A little bit about the Honeywell Visimatic 615….this rangefinder camera seems to be a copy of the Petri Computor 35. It has a CdS cell mounted on the lens and a battery operated shutter. I found it’s rangefinder fairly easy to use but not entirely sure of the sharpness of the lens after shooting one roll with this camera. The first roll had some unsharp frames, and I’m not sure exactly why. Despite it being a mostly bright day, there were some that seemed to have a bit of camera shake or motion blur. In fact I shot two rolls, but the second was completely blank, I think due to dead batteries. Unfortunately this funny little camera makes the same odd shutter-sounding noise whether the shutter is opening or not and apparently it was not! I guess I did not notice that its orange and green lights were not lighting up. It always happens on a roll you actually cared a bit about too…

Like most of the small rangefinders of this era, it has a fully automatic setting, in this case “EE” and all you have to worry about is focusing. It does have an aperture priority mode as well if you want to use it, though it is mainly for if you have a flash mounted to the camera.  The 3rd roll I shot as another test roll to see if it was in fact just a dead battery in the camera turned out just fine so I’m happy this little camera is still going strong. It was a very expired roll of film however, so the colour is pretty questionable!

Here are a few shots from the first roll…

 

 

And a couple from the 3rd “tester” roll, featuring very expired Kodak film…

 


Interested in learning more about the new Fujifilm GFX 50R?

Come and see Fujifilm’s newest, lightest and most affordable medium format mirrorless camera. Enjoy a gallery style exhibit of prints taken by Patrick LaRoque with the GFX 50R and speak to Patrick about his first hand experience with the camera. The “Fuji Guys” will also be available for all your technical questions! Food and refreshments will be served.

Please RSVP at the Eventbrite link here: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/fujifilm-gfx-50r-launch-event-tickets-50924177586

Space is limited and filling up quickly!

 


Those that know Meghan and I know that we have what appears to be an on going camera acquisition problem. To remedy this but continue to try out ALL of the cameras we have decided to start borrowing cameras from our fellow camera enthusiasts instead of trying to purchase or hoard them all to ourselves. Not all are winners though and some are just easier or more fun to use but you have to shoot with them first to find out! Thus, we decided if we run a roll through every camera we are interested in, not unlike going on a 5 minute date with a bunch of strangers at a singles night, we can quickly see which are worthy of being added to our collection (or put on our list of “must haves.”) Camera speed dating!

Here is most recent camera I had the pleasure of a quick date with…. the Rolleiflex Twin Lens Reflex.

A few quick facts about Rolleiflex (s), nothing to specific though because I forgot to figure out the exact model of the camera before returning it. The first Rolleiflex was released in 1929. The second was released ten years later. It was around then that all the variants cropping up.

Most of the time I remain loyal to my darling Rolleicord Va, however the opportunity to try the higher end Rollei TLR came up so I took it. I am usually put off the Rolleiflexes because typically Rolleiflexes are larger than Rolleicords and have an coupled shutter / advance lever instead of a dial and separate shutter cock pin which is more tucked into the camera. However if I already didn’t love my Rolleicord so much, I’d have to say using the Rolleiflex was quite lovely. Which is probably why it was one of the most prolific TLR’s ever made, so much so that there were many other brands that modeled their TLRs after the Rolleiflex. It had clear sharp focus and felt sturdy and well made in my hands.

Here are a couple of photos I took and one from when Meghan tried it out.