Those that know Nicole and I know that we have what appears to be an on going camera acquisition problem. To remedy this but continue to try out ALL of the cameras we have decided to start borrowing cameras from our fellow camera enthusiasts instead of trying to purchase or hoard them all to ourselves. (Though that does still undoubtedly happen too.) Not all are winners though and some are just easier or more fun to use but you have to shoot with them first to find out! Thus, we decided if we run a roll through every camera we are interested in, not unlike going on a 5 minute date with a bunch of strangers at a singles night, we can quickly see which are worthy of being added to our collection (or put on our list of “must haves.”) Camera speed dating!

Here is most recent camera I had the pleasure of a quick date with…the GAF Memo 35 EE 35mm rangefinder.

 

A few quick facts about the GAF MEMO 35 EE…this sweet little rangefinder camera was made by Chinon for GAF (formerly Ansco) in the 1970s. It is almost a direct copy of a Konica C35 with a Chinon 38mm f/2.7 lens. So not surprising I have a strange affinity for this wee camera, as I love Ansco cameras and seem to have recently acquired a love for Chinons. I hadn’t shot my C35 when I bought this little GAF camera, and had no idea they were essentially the same camera. I came across it at a flea market, in a bin of unexciting cameras, stuffed in it’s little case. The flea market overall had been rather disappointing but this last minute $5 purchase made up for it. It was my second random rangefinder camera purchase and I was incredibly surprised when it took really great photos. Like the C35, you basically just set this camera to the “A” setting and away you go. It’s coupled rangefinder is clear and very easy to use and I love how small this camera is to carry around. Possibly the best $5 I ever spent! Here are a few (mainly dog related) shots I took with it last summer on Lomo 400.

 

 

 


Profoto has some big news about a small new light. They have just announced the B10!

Shooting on location has lots of challenges. One of the most significant challenges arises before you even go there. How much gear to bring? Bring too much, and you’re weighed down by lights and cables. Not enough and the chances of capturing the image you’d hoped for might be compromised.

That’s why Profoto created the Profoto B10, their smallest and most lightweight off-camera flash ever. With five times the power of a speedlight packed into the size and shape of a camera lens, the Profoto B10 makes it easy to be creative with light anywhere. In addition, the B10 is more than just a flash. It’s also a bright and dimmable continuous light that you can use to light both stills and videos. And the adjustable color temperature makes it easy to blend with ambient light.

Compatibility with Profoto’s light shaping tools expand your creative opportunities further. You can choose any tool from the lightweight OCF family or select between over 120 light shaping tools available in the full Profoto range. The tools let you create any mood or feeling with light.

The clean and minimal interface makes the B10 easy to use straight from the box. The battery is quick and easy to replace, and you can also charge it while it’s in use. If you have an assistant, the B10 is light enough to be used handheld and if you set it up by yourself you can just as easily mount it on a camera tripod or on a light stand.

You can trigger and control the B10 wirelessly with any Profoto AirTTL remote, with a Profoto A1, or connect it with the Profoto app. Through the app you can view and control all the settings from your smartphone screen, experience creative capture with your smartphone and download all the latest upgrades.

For full details go to : https://profoto.com/ca/b10

Call or email prosales@beauphoto.com to get your order in soon.


Those that know Nicole and I know that we have what appears to be an on going camera acquisition problem. To remedy this but continue to try out ALL of the cameras we have decided to start borrowing cameras from our fellow camera enthusiasts instead of trying to purchase or hoard them all to ourselves. Not all are winners though and some are just easier or more fun to use but you have to shoot with them first to find out! Thus, we decided if we run a roll through every camera we are interested in, not unlike going on a 5 minute date with a bunch of strangers at a singles night, we can quickly see which are worthy of being added to our collection (or put on our list of “must haves.”) Camera speed dating!

Here is most recent camera I had the pleasure of a quick date with…the Canon Canonet QL17 GIII.

 

A little bit about the Canonet QL17 G-III….this was the last version of the Canonet produced, being the version III. The Canonet is one the most iconic rangefinder cameras and likely the best selling rangerfinder (with built in light meter) ever. It’s world renowned fame is well-deserved though, as this little camera is a no nonesense, quality camera all around. It’s super fast 40mm f/1.7 lens is very sharp and this camera is incredibly easy to use and quick to focus. Of course being made in the 70s the original battery was a mercury cell, which are no longer available, so when you put in a new battery it can mean the light meter is not quite accurate. This is the case with the majority of old cameras like this and just like my  Konica C35, I just threw a battery in there and shot away. Alot of people will try to adjust or mod the camera to factor this in, but I found both cameras to perform very well without bothering to do that. The QL designation on the Canonet stands for “quick load” and is just another reason why this camera is so easy to use. Loading the film is near foolproof.

This camera was created for the masses, so in general it is very fool proof, and there are quite a few to be had in the world, but because there were so many produced and sold some are a bit worse for wear than others. The Canonet is definitely near the top of my list of fun cameras to shoot and I was beyond pleasantly surprised with the results of its first test roll. I long for the black version, which are much more rare, but this little silver one is great and will stay with me for years to come.  Here are a couple of shots from my first roll, shot on Lomo 400.

 


Those that know Meghan and I know that we have what appears to be an on going camera acquisition problem. To remedy this but continue to try out ALL of the cameras we have decided to start borrowing cameras from our fellow camera enthusiasts instead of trying to purchase or hoard them all to ourselves. Not all are winners though and some are just easier or more fun to use but you have to shoot with them first to find out! Thus, we decided if we run a roll through every camera we are interested in, not unlike going on a 5 minute date with a bunch of strangers at a singles night, we can quickly see which are worthy of being added to our collection (or put on our list of “must haves.”) Camera speed dating!

Here is most recent camera I (well, WE this time) had the pleasure of a quick double date with the…Olympus Pen F.

 

A few quick facts about the Olympus Pen F; released in the early 60’s I believe this is one of the few SLR half frame cameras ever made. It manages to be smaller than most other SLR cameras because it has a Porro prism viewfinder and its mirror flips sideways instead of up like most other SLR cameras. It has a high shutter speed of 500.

As I had mentioned in the newsletter, I have decided this is the most under rated street shooting camera ever! It’s physical size is handy, almost unnoticeable it’s so small and its half frame format makes reloading less frequent. It does have a luxurious sounding shutter but I feel shutter noise when street shooting isn’t as critical as it used to be, people now a days are too distracted or don’t remember what a true mechanical shutter even sounds like. With my Olympus Pen F I shot Lomo 400 35-36 and had a beat up 38mm lens that I was lucky enough to be given, however I found most of my pictures slightly out of focus…. now this could be because I was trying my ‘spontaneous shooting-think later’ type method (shutter speed set to 250, aperture f5.6 to 8), the intense smoke that blanketed the city that day, the smaller negative of a half frame or the fact the lens sharpness is minimally “off”. I will borrow an non-haggard 38mm lens and re-shoot and in the mean time I will get Frank to look over my 38mm.  

Here’s Meghan’s two cents about shooting with her Pen F…

Like, Nicole, I enjoyed the size of this camera and the ease of use for street shooting. I have a Pentax 35mm f/3.5 mounted on mine with an adapter however and honestly found like I was having trouble deciding if my subject matter was in focus. I found the viewfinder very dark, which made it difficult to focus quickly. I ended up shooting alot of my roll on infinity for that reason, and though most of those turned out, alot of my mid-field focused shots actually worked out pretty well too. There were definitely a few that I in fact did not focus properly on though. It was a very strange day, one of the smokiest here in the Lower Mainland this summer, and that certainly made for strange shooting down in Gastown. I think I’d like to shoot this camera again on a brighter day and try it with a proper Olympus lens, but I’m not sure this will be a frequent shooter for me. I do love half-frame cameras though and did really enjoy it’s functionality otherwise! I shot Kodak Ultramax 400 135-24 as my test roll. Though funnily enough I thought it was a roll of 36 ex and was saddened to find out for the last half of my roll I wasn’t really taking any photos as the camera did not stop advancing, it just kept on going! Womp, womp. 🙁

Here are Nicole’s images from the double date….

 

 

Here are Meghan’s shots….

 

 

We do enjoy a good double date though and we may just have to try this one again….

 

 

 


Those that know Meghan and I know that we have what appears to be an on going camera acquisition problem. To remedy this but continue to try out ALL of the cameras we have decided to start borrowing cameras from our fellow camera enthusiasts instead of trying to purchase or hoard them all to ourselves. Not all are winners though and some are just easier or more fun to use but you have to shoot with them first to find out! Thus, we decided if we run a roll through every camera we are interested in, not unlike going on a 5 minute date with a bunch of strangers at a singles night, we can quickly see which are worthy of being added to our collection (or put on our list of “must haves.”) Camera speed dating!

Here is most recent camera I had the pleasure of a quick date with…. the Ansco Shur-Flash 120 box camera.

 

A few quick facts about the Shur-Flash; it is a ’50’s 120 box camera that shoots a 6×9 negative. Its lay out is slightly different than other box cameras as it has a raised viewfinder and not just tiny ground glass viewers. It also has an actual shutter button as opposed to a lever that clicks up and down as was popular with Kodak box cameras. The Shur-Flash has one aperture and one shutter speed, the flash (if I owned one) would fit on the top.

I really enjoy using box cameras, this one was no exception, though as usual the day was so perfect (blue skies and giant puffy white clouds – my fave) I did regret only bringing a box camera out with me. I decided to shoot some multiple exposures and some street. I find box cameras less intrusive for shooting street scenes with as it does not look high tech or need to get in anyone’s face to capture a great shot. I thought it went rather well. However upon getting my film back I realized it did not go that well at all. Almost every second shot was blurry, which means the second exposure on a double and some single street shots. At first I thought perhaps I was depressing the shutter too hard and wobbling the camera as I did, but that seemed unlikely as it was very bright out when I took the blurry ones (and I got sharp ones during cloud cover) and it’s a button shutter not a lever. A gentleman even insisted I take his photo, leaving no excuse for me to be rushed or hurriedly sneaky and it came out blurry! I was feeling extremely vexed and told Kathy, she suggested perhaps the shutter spring in the camera has lost some of its spring causing its tension to be inconsistent. That is also annoying….I don’t usually keep cameras around I can’t shoot, unless they are exceptionally cute! I will say I did get a couple double exposures I don’t mind being sharp & blurry, it has opened my eyes up to that perspective.

 


Those that know Meghan and I know that we have what appears to be an on going camera acquisition problem. To remedy this but continue to try out ALL of the cameras we have decided to start borrowing cameras from our fellow camera enthusiasts instead of trying to purchase or hoard them all to ourselves. Not all are winners though and some are just easier or more fun to use but you have to shoot with them first to find out! Thus, we decided if we run a roll through every camera we are interested in, not unlike going on a 5 minute date with a bunch of strangers at a singles night, we can quickly see which are worthy of being added to our collection (or put on our list of “must haves.”) Camera speed dating!

Here is most recent camera I had the pleasure of a quick date with…the Rollei XF 35

 

 

A few quick facts about the Rollei XF 35…it is a coupled rangefinder camera manufactured in 1974 and has 40mm f2.3 lens.

Despite how cute this camera looks with its shiney black exterior and square shape, this date turned out to be not so favorable, reinforcing my prejudices toward mid-quality/spectrum  rangefinders. But I’ll mention its good points first, I was delighted that the exposure in all lighting conditions seemed to be spot on and the camera is quite enjoyable to use- it has a nice smooth advance lever and shutter button. However as always when I use a rangefinder of mid quality it would seem the rangefinder’s focus is ever so slightly off, leaving all my photos with incredible sharp focus just behind my subject, illustrating the lenses potential but still managing to infuriate me. At infinity it seems alright…. This never seems to happen to Meghan which is probably why she loves these little point & shoot cameras from the late ’60’s-early 70’s so much. Needless to say I am going to get our expert camera repair man, Frank to have a look, just to be positive ts somehow not just me. (It wasn’t….the rangefinder was indeed loose inside. Thanks, Frank!)

 

 



Those that know Meghan and I know that we have what appears to be an on going camera acquisition problem. To remedy this but continue to try out ALL of the cameras we have decided to start borrowing cameras from our fellow camera enthusiasts instead of trying to purchase or hoard them all to ourselves. Not all are winners though and some are just easier or more fun to use but you have to shoot with them first to find out! Thus, we decided if we run a roll through every camera we are interested in, not unlike going on a 5 minute date with a bunch of strangers at a singles night, we can quickly see which are worthy of being added to our collection (or put on our list of “must haves.”) Camera speed dating!

Here is most recent camera I had the pleasure of a quick date with…. the Linhof 220 120 format camera.

 

 

A few quick facts about the Linhof 220, it is a 6×7 camera with a 95mm, f3.5 Technikar lens. It takes both 220 and 120 film. First released in 1966, it is definitely one of the more unique looking 6×7 cameras out there. It looks a bit like a police radar gun. It is one of the  strangest shaped cameras I’ve shot certainly!

I enjoyed my time using this camera. I like how light weight it is for a 6×7 and I know I will enjoy it even more once I find an appropriate camera strap for it, as it is a bit awkward to carry around otherwise. Its photos came out very sharp, so I was pretty thrilled with it’s quality. Its rangefinder is in fairly good condition for its age too, and using the camera is pretty straight forward. At first I found one thing tricky with the advance lever (which is a double pump) though, as every time I advanced the camera would pivot slightly on its handle. After listening to my exasperated attempts a few times Mike pointed out a better way to go about positioning my hand while advancing the film, so the problem was solved!

 

 

 


Those that know Meghan and I know that we have what appears to be an on going camera acquisition problem. To remedy this but continue to try out ALL of the cameras we have decided to start borrowing cameras from our fellow camera enthusiasts instead of trying to purchase or hoard them all to ourselves. Not all are winners though and some are just easier or more fun to use but you have to shoot with them first to find out! Thus, we decided if we run a roll through every camera we are interested in, not unlike going on a 5 minute date with a bunch of strangers at a singles night, we can quickly see which are worthy of being added to our collection (or put on our list of “must haves.”) Camera speed dating!

Here is most recent camera I had the pleasure of a quick date with…the Olympus Infinity Jr.

 

 

A few quick facts about the Olympus Infinity Jr. This point and shoot camera has a relatively fast auto focus lens- f3.5 and was designed to turn on and off using the sliding clam shell style front lens cover Olympus is now known for. Its has only the essential functions, self timer and flash controls, Auto, off and fill-flash.

I am particularly drawn to it because it was first manufactured in 1987. I have a soft spot for things designed and made in ’86 – ’87. I took the Infinity Jr. on a date to the beach. I really appreciate the sliding clam shell front, as it protects the lens well. I once had a point & shoot and it only had those delicate little blades covering it and a few specs of grit got in there and they started not opening & closing properly. Also, in my opinion, its flash controls are far superior to its successor the infamous Olympus Stylus Epic Mju’s control buttons (which have stuck on occasion rendering the camera infuriatingly unusable). The switch for the flash is in a slightly unusual spot under the lens, but offers intuitive options: slide it to the far right for fill flash, and the middle for no flash, leaving standard position when you’d like auto functions. Every time you slide the front closed to turn the camera off it also slides the flash control back into auto position.

 


Above Photo Credit: Caspian Kai

As you may have read in our monthly newsletter, here is, as promised, the video clip from my first Super 8 endeavor. If you missed out on the newsletter article, here is an excerpt:

“I’ve just come back from my Bass Coast Music Festival
Holiday! I must admit I am a little miffed at myself, I had 6
cameras that I planned to use: my Revere Stereo, Horizon,
Lomo Spinner, Canon 1014XL-S, Pentax *ist, and my Fuji
Digital XT1. I found for the first time ever at a festival that I
either didn’t have enough time or the energy left to shoot
with all the cameras I brought. Our group had arrived to
the festival grounds early to build an art installation and
that alone made me think that the various panoramic
cameras and stereo camera would be a neat way to
document the project, but sadly the build tired my brain
out more than I anticipated and I shot far less film photos
than usual.

I did however do the one thing I have been too chicken to
do for a long time now: shoot a roll of Kodak Tri-X7266
Super 8 film. Recently someone gave me a 1979 Canon
1014XL-S, and when that happened, any excuses I could
use to stall my Super 8 endeavours were eliminated. The
Canon 1014XL-S is a well thought out piece of machinery.

I found myself dreading cracking open its manual, but turns
out it is very straightforward and easy to understand. As
I read the manual, I looked at the camera’s settings and
adjusted them to what I thought I’d need. Once I got to
Bass Coast all that was left to do is load the film, which is in
a foolproof cartridge format, then flip the camera on
and hold the trigger. One of my favourite things about the
camera is the whirring sound it made while I was shooting.
The camera even uses six AA batteries, the simplest option
as long as you remember to remove them when you’re not
using it. The instruction manual assured me that if I focused
on a subject and then moved around, it should somehow
keep focus.”

To read the full article, go here: http://www.beauphoto.com/wp-content/uploads/aug2018.pdf